Clinicians

Tackling the burden of chronic wounds

Rising numbers of painful, hard-to-heal wounds has been described as a ‘hidden health crisis’ which costs the NHS more than £5bn annually.16

Electrical stimulation is one of the most evidence-based technologies in wound management and is proven to be effective in accelerating healing in multiple wound types9–13 and reducing wound pain. It is safe to use and has minimal side effects.9,17

However, until now, it has not been available in a format that can be easily used in everyday clinical practice.

Accel-Heal makes this possible

Accel-Heal works by applying two electrode pads to skin near the wound which are connected to the Accel-Heal device. With the simple push of a button, the device delivers a pre-set, automated programme of subsensory electrical pulses to the wound to stimulate the normal healing process.

Pain is relieved in as little as a few days, sometimes within a few hours,18 which improves patient tolerance with gold standard practices, such as compression therapy, to continue healing.

Patients who are suitable for Accel-Heal

  • Patients with a hard-to-heal wound that is not progressing to healing
  • Patients who are experiencing reduced mobility caused by their pain
  • Patients whose wound pain causes them to be intolerant to treatment

How Accel-Heal works

Every cell in the human body is finely tuned to tiny electrical stimuli – the cells in the wound bed are no exception.  Electrical stimulation devices like Accel-Heal stimulate wound bed cells into ‘healing’ behaviours, kick-starting wound-healing processes like granulation tissue formation and epithelial cell migration.10

Electrical stimulation also influences inflammation.19 It is thought that the effect on inflammation is linked to the pain relief that is experienced in some patients within hours of applying Accel-Heal.18

As therapy progresses, the pain relief afforded by Accel-Heal can lead to behaviour changes in the patient.3, 18,22 A less painful wound can lead to an increased compliance to other aspects of their wound treatment, and can allow patients to resume their daily activities. 1,22

The cumulative effect of improved compliance to treatment and an improvement in the cell ‘healing’ behaviours lead to positive clinical outcomes, including improved rates of healing and quality of life. 2,6

References

See All

1. Turner N, L. Ovens. Clinical outcome results and quality of life improvements using electroceutical treatment * – Patient perspectives. In: EWMA 2018. ; 2018.

2. Guest J, Singh H, Rana K, Vowden P. Cost-effectiveness of an electroceutical device in treating non-healing venous leg ulcers: results of an RCT. J Wound Care. 2018;27(4):230-243.

3. Chapman-Jones D, Young S, Tadej M. Assessment of wound healing following electrical stimulation with Accel-Heal®. Wounds UK. 2010;6(3):67-71.

6. Guest JF, Ayoub N, Greaves T. Clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of an externally applied electroceutical device in managing venous leg ulcers in clinical practice in the UK. J Wound Care. 2015;24(12):574-580.

9. Girgis B, Duarte J. High Voltage Monophasic Pulsed Current (HVMPC) for stage II-IV pressure ulcer healing. A systematic review and meta-analysis. J Tissue Viability. 2018;27(4):274-284.

10. Khouri C, Kotzki S, Roustit M, Blaise S, Gueyffier F, Cracowski J. Hierarchical evaluation of electrical stimulation protocols for chronic wound healing : An effect size meta-analysis. Wound Repair Regen. 2017:883-891. doi:10.1111/wrr.12594.

11. Lala D, Spaulding S, Burke S, Houghton P. Electrical stimulation therapy for the treatment of pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis. . Int Wound J. 2016;13(6):1214-1226.

12. Gardner S, Frantz R, Schmidt F. Effect of electrical stimulation on chronic wound healing: a meta-analysis. Wound Repair Regen. 1999;7(6):495-503.

13. Liu L, Moody J, Gall A. A Quantitative, Pooled Analysis and Systematic Review of Controlled Trials on the Impact of Electrical Stimulation Settings and Placement on Pressure Ulcer Healing Rates in Persons With Spinal Cord Injuries. Ostomy Wound Manag. 2016;62(7):16-34.

14. Tadej M, Young S, Hampton S. Accel-Heal® : A new therapy for chronic wounds. J Community Nurs. 2010;24(5):16-21.

15. Young S, Hampton S, Tadej M. Study to evaluate the effect of low-intensity pulsed electrical currents on levels of oedema in chronic non-healing wounds. J Wound Care. 2011;20(8):1-6.

16. Guest JF, Ayoub N, Mcilwraith T, et al. Health economic burden that wounds impose on the National Health Service in the UK. Br Med J Open. 2015;5:e009283. doi:10.1136/.

17. Piaggesi A, S L, F B, Al. E. EWMA document: advanced therapies in wound management: cell and tissue-based therapies, physical and bio-physical therapies smart and IT based technologies. J Wound Care. 2018;27(Suppl 6):1-137.

18. L. Ovens. Application of Accel-Heal® for patients with chronic venous leg ulcers: an evaluation in a community UK NHS trust. Wounds UK. 2019;15(3):78-84.

19. Lallyett C, Yeung CYC, Nielson RH, et al. Changes in S100 Proteins Identified in Healthy Skin following Electrical Stimulation: Relevance for Wound Healing. Adv Ski Wound Care. 2018;31(7):322-327. doi:10.1097/01.ASW.0000533722.06780.03.

22. Greaves T. Improving patient quality of life with innovative electroceutical technology: A case series. In: Presented at Wounds UK. ; 2014.

 

Case studies

Positive examples of how Accel-Heal has kick-started healing for our patients and improved their quality of life.

Clinical evidence

A wealth of studies have recognised that electric stimulation improves the healing process whilst reducing pain and inflammation. Learn more about the evidence behind Accel-Heal and how it allows patients to recover faster and get back to their daily lives.

Faq

Questions and answers for clinicians and patients. Read more for insights and advice on how to use the Accel-Heal device and what you can expect from treatment.

How can Accel-Heal help you?